Coronavirus cases in Kenya rise to 3,727 after 133 more patients test positive


The total number of COVID-19 infections in Kenya on Monday rose to 3,727 after 133 more patients tested positive for the disease.

Health Cabinet Secretary Mutahi Kagwe, speaking in Nyandarua on a tour of the county’s health facilities, said a total of 3,365 samples were tested within the last 24 hours.

All the positive cases are Kenyans, with 93 being males and 40 females, aged between 1-70 years.

The 133 cases are distributed in the following counties; Mombasa (61), Nairobi (53), Kilifi (7), Busia (6), Kiambu (2), Kajiado, Nakuru, Murang’a, and Kitui 1 case each.

The 61 Mombasa cases were recorded in the following sub-counties: Likoni (24), Mvita (19), Nyali (7), Kisauni (5), Changamwe (5), and Jomvu (1).

In Nairobi, the cases are from: Mathare (10), Kamukunji (9), Westlands (6), Starehe (5), Makadara (4), Embakasi West, Embakasi East, and Kibra 3 cases each; Ruaraka, Embakasi South, and Kasarani 2 cases each; Embakasi Central, Dagoretti North, Dagoretti South and Lang’ata 1 case each.

In Kilifi, all 7 cases are from Rabai while in Busia the 6 cases are from Busia POE (4) and Bumala, Nambale 1 case each.


Kiambu has 2 cases from Kiambu town, Kajiado has 1 case from Kajiado Central while Nakuru has 1 case from Nakuru West.

Murang’a has 1 case from Maragwa and Kitui has 1 case from Kitui Central.

CS Kagwe also stated that 33 patients had since been discharged from various facilities across the country hence taking the number of recoveries to 1,286.

The CS however expressed remorse saying the country had lost one patient, hence the tally of coronavirus-related deaths now stands at 104.

“The number of those infected continues to rise. As a country, we must take individual responsibility to curtail this,” he said.

CS Kagwe further noted that Nyandarua is among only 9 of the 47 counties that are yet to record a single COVID-19 case.

“I want to appeal to the people of Nyandarua to maintain this status. What happens elsewhere is that when you get one case, and then another, it grows exponentially and soon you start to hear the kind of numbers you’re hearing in Nairobi and elsewhere,” he added.
'; (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })();